Pyrotechnics – Friday Fictioneers Flash Fiction

Every Wednesday we get a new picture prompt for the Friday Fictioneers, a writing challenge graciously hosted by our Fairy Blog Mother Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.

vijaya

Pyrotechnics

At first they seemed harmless. There was fighting on occasion, but we thought they’d merely been asserting their new borders. We were wrong.

When the fireworks started, the children were the first to run outside. They whooped for every fiery spider, starburst, or flower in the sky. We followed them, but we didn’t laugh. Something smelled fishy. We were right.

We stood and watched, but the fireworks weren’t pretty any longer; they had become grenades. In a brutal, new, starburst pattern, children and adults ran for cover but it was too late. We were stupid. Soon we’ll all be dead.

(100 words)

I pledge
The task of the challenge is to write a story: beginning, middle, and end, in 100 words or less. You can find all the Fictioneers’ stories when you click on the Froggy. Please read, comment, and if you like, join the fun. Everyone is welcome.

 


Image prompt © Vijaya Sundaram. Used with permission for this Friday Fictioneers Challenge only. Any other use of this image requires Vijaya’s permission.

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62 thoughts on “Pyrotechnics – Friday Fictioneers Flash Fiction

    1. You’re right, most explosions have their own, cruel aesthetics. I don’t know why. Maybe because what is powerful always is dangerous and we’re drawn to power? If it’s beautiful too, we’re even more drawn? Or we like to play with fire? No idea. 😀 Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Dear Gabriele,

    I remember my father telling me about how impressive the explosions were in the war. I like the way your story smoothly went from something beautiful to something sinister. Nicely done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Rochelle. We do like to watch things blowing up, don’t we? There’s a reason why chemistry classes with magnesium flares and oxyhydrogen explosions are the most popular… 😀

      Like

  2. How low can humans get… It reminds me of the landmines hidden in plastic toys… children picking them up to play… There were rumors that Soviet used this in Afghanistan, but I did check and it was just that they were mistaken for toys… anyway the same result when children picked them up to play.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Yes, sounds about right. As we say to the kids in America, “It’s always fun and games until someone loses an eye.” This, in all seriousness, of course, is bigger than that. 😀

    Fine work, Gabriele! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. We love to see things go BOOM, but it must be horror to see terror reign outside your door every single day.

    One bit of critique–in the last paragraph, “In a brutal, new, starburst pattern, children and adults ran for cover” were the people actually running in a starburst pattern, or were you describing the explosions? It was a little unclear to me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Russel. I was struggling with this sentence, mostly with the punctuation. What I meant is that they all ran in all directions for cover and by that formed the starburst pattern. Would ‘scattered for cover’ work better?

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Truly great story – nicely written, great transitions. Reminded me of a familly story my partner recently told me about raising a family in a bomb shelter during wwii. Let’s never forget the horribles of war is and the destruction it brings!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Lure them in with something desirable – isn’t that exactly how the purveyors of evil operate? Cigarettes, alcohol, drugs – all the things that attract the young with promises of pleasure and end up – well, we all know how it ends up. Well told, Gabriele. I’m reading it as allegory here – hope I’m not too far off course.

    Liked by 1 person

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